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Recent Publications

A selection of research publications from the Urban Forestry Program are listed below:

The Accuracy of Photo-Based Plant Identification Apps on Northeastern Trees. (6.87MB PDF)

Author

Ryan J. Schmidt, Brianna Casario, Pam Zipse, Jason C. Grabosky

Poster is linked in the title, formal technical document to follow.

Life cycle curves linked to root zone colonization space for urban trees as a foundation to meet urban forest design and longivity goals. (511k PDF)

Author

Jason Grabosky

Abstract

In an increasingly urban world society, there is a need to provide fit habitats for urban dwellers. Toward that end, the development of methods for urban tree and whole urban canopy management is foundational for the provision of a quality environment. Life cycle curves are a convenient method which can be developed for specific or generalized service value provisions. Furthermore, such curves can be developed on common design forms and tree typologies within a regional species palette. A series of studies in New Jersey and Florida inform the idea to suggest the feasibility and merit of such an approach for urban tree management planning.

Citation

Grabosky, J. (2017). Life cycle curves linked to root zone colonization space for urban trees as a foundation to meet urban forest design and longevity goals. Acta Hortic. 1189, 363-370
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1189.70

Maintenance of photosynthesis by Betula populifolia in metal contaminated soils.

Authors

Allyson B.Salisbury, Frank J. Gallagher, Joshua S. Caplan, Jason C. Grabosky

Abstract

Improving our understanding of plant responses to elevated trace metal concentrations under field conditions will enhance restoration and urban greening practices in settings with contaminated soils. This study examined the effects of trace metal pollution on the leaf gas exchange rates of mature, field grown Betula populifolia Marsh. (gray birch) trees, additionally assessing whether elevated temperature and drought compounded the effects of trace metal contamination. The study compared B. populifolia growing in areas of comparatively high and low trace metal loads (HML and LML, respectively) within a former rail yard at Liberty State Park in Jersey City, New Jersey, USA. Gas exchange parameters were determined monthly from May through September in 2014 and 2015 using a portable photosynthesis system. The effects of drought and high temperature were assessed during a short heat wave in July 2015 and via a manipulative experiment, respectively. During a few of the measurement months, some parameters differed significantly between the LML and HML groups. However, when considered over the entire study period, no significant differences in biophysical parameters were observed between groups. The photosynthetic capacity of B. populifolia thus appears to be fairly robust across this site's steep gradient of trace metal contamination. Nonetheless, leaf mass per unit area was significantly lower in the HML group, indicating that metal loads affected resource allocation within trees. Also, immediately following the heatwave in 2015, intrinsic water use efficiency declined significantly in the HML group, suggesting that extreme climatic conditions can have a disproportionate effect on the physiological performance of plants growing in metal contaminated soils.

Citation

Salisbury, A., F. Gallagher, J. Caplan, J. Grabosky. 2017. Maintenance of photosynthesis by Betula populifolia in metal contaminated soils. Science of the Total Environment; doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.12.279